FAQs for invited survey respondents

HRMI? Her-me? Her-mi?

‘The Human Rights Measurement Initiative’ is a bit of a mouthful, so we call it HRMI for short, pronounced ‘her-mee’.

“Comparative data on countries’ human rights performance is a useful way to hold governments to account. The Human Rights Measurement Initiative’s work depends on cooperation from human rights defenders everywhere to develop and share the best possible data and to make use of the results.”

– Ken Roth, Executive Director, Human Rights Watch

HRMI is the first global project to track the human rights performance of countries. One of the main ways we do this is with our annual data collection through the annual HRMI survey.

As Ken Roth, Executive Director of Human Rights Watch says, “Comparative data on countries’ human rights performance is a useful way to hold governments to account. The Human Rights Measurement Initiative’s work depends on cooperation from human rights defenders everywhere to develop and share the best possible data and to make use of the results.”

This year we are running the survey in 19 countries: Angola, Australia, Brazil, Democratic Republic of Congo, Fiji, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela, and Vietnam.

Here’s how the survey works, and how you might be able to take part.

Why a survey?

The most accurate information on any country’s overall human rights situation comes from local and regional human rights workers.

We have developed a special online questionnaire which asks human rights workers around the world the same questions about how well their government respects human rights in their country.

Our Civil and Political Rights Lead Dr K Chad Clay leads a team of political scientists at the University of Georgia who have designed the survey carefully, and who analyse the data that come in from our survey respondents. They use advanced statistical techniques to ensure cross-country comparability and calculate measures of certainty for each country score. You can read more about the survey methodology here.

Is taking part worth your time?

The more human rights workers that take part, the stronger the data will be.

Taking part in HRMI’s annual data collection is a win-win activity. Your investment of 30-60 minutes sharing your knowledge with us means that your country will have world-leading data and metrics independently detailing the human rights situation. The more human rights workers that take part, the stronger the data will be.

Anyone can access all our data, for free, at our data site.

Human rights monitors and defenders can use our data, along with other evidence from their own work, to show governments where there is room for improvement, and even create a bit of healthy competition with similar countries.

Who can participate?

Our survey respondents are human rights researchers and practitioners who are monitoring events in any of the countries we’re collecting data in. The kinds of people we’re looking for include:

  • Human rights workers (researchers, analysts, other practitioners) whose job is to monitor civil and political rights in a survey country. They could be working for an international or domestic NGO or civil society organisation.
  • Human rights lawyers.
  • Journalists covering human rights issues in a survey country.
  • Staff working for the National Human Rights Institution (NHRI) of a survey country, if that NHRI is accredited with ‘A status’ – meaning that it is fully compliant with the Paris Principles.

Do survey respondents have to be living in the country they’re giving information on?

In most cases survey respondents are living in the country they are providing information on, but there are exceptions.

The more the country is inhospitable to human rights defenders (e.g. Saudi Arabia) or in crisis (e.g. DRC, Venezuela) the more survey respondents are likely to be based elsewhere.

Also, some human rights researchers for NGOs are responsible for monitoring more than one country, so they will be qualified to answer questions about countries they don’t live in.

Who shouldn’t take the survey?

To ensure our independence and avoid conflicts of interest, we do not collect information from government officials or from staff working at government-organised NGOs.

We are looking for respondents who have access to primary sources and are often the first points of contact for human rights information on the ground. For this reason, we do not invite human rights academics to be survey respondents unless they are also practitioners, working with primary sources of information.

I’ve been invited to participate. What’s the next step?

If you’ve been invited to participate in the survey for your country, you will have been sent a link to a secure registration/consent form.  Please fill it in. It takes about 30 seconds. Everyone who has registered will then be sent a unique single-use link to the survey itself.

If you’ve been invited to participate in the survey for your country, you will have been sent a link to a secure registration/consent form.  Please fill it in. It takes about 30 seconds.

If you have been invited to take part, we encourage you to suggest other colleagues or contacts who can also be survey respondents. As long as you are registered yourself, you can forward the registration form to your contacts now. There will also be a space in the survey itself to nominate other potential survey respondents.

The survey links will be sent out in February and March 2019.

Are my details safe with HRMI?

We take our survey respondents’ safety and information security extremely seriously. You can read here how we work to make sure the information you give us in the registration form is kept confidential.

The survey itself is confidential and anonymous so there is no way for anyone to connect your answers with your name.

What’s the role of the HRMI Ambassadors?

We can’t vet every potential respondent personally to make sure they’re appropriate people who have the information we need. We rely on HRMI Ambassadors to contact as many potential survey respondents as they can in their country, and help with other parts of the survey roll-out, like checking local language translations. When Ambassadors contact local practitioners who then nominate other potential survey respondents, that is what we call the snowball effect.

In other words, our HRMI Ambassadors start the snowball rolling by approaching potential survey respondents and inviting them to participate. Then we ask all of those people to suggest more names.

Our Ambassadors are an enormous help! You can meet those of our Ambassadors whose names are public on our team page.

Here’s a short video interview with our Ambassador for Mozambique, David Matsinhe, who is an Amnesty International researcher, specialising in monitoring the Lusophone countries of Southern Africa:

Several of our ambassadors feature in other videos on our YouTube channel.

Thank you!

Our cutting-edge data and metrics rely on hundreds of human rights workers around the world offering us their time and knowledge. We appreciate it enormously.

If you are taking part in the HRMI survey, we offer you sincere and warm thanks. We couldn’t do this without you.

Thanks for your interest in HRMI. You are also most welcome to follow us on TwitterYouTube and Facebook, and sign up to receive occasional newsletters here