New civil and political human rights metrics to be produced for 13 countries

The Human Rights Measurement Initiative (HRMI) is pleased to announce the first round of countries for which we will be producing our new civil and political rights metrics. The 13 countries are: Angola, Australia, Brazil, Fiji, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia and the United Kingdom.

The 13 countries are: Angola, Australia, Brazil, Fiji, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia and the United Kingdom.

These countries have all been volunteered for inclusion by (mostly in-country) human rights country experts. We are happy that they represent significant diversity in country size, income, cultures and degrees of political and economic openness.

Next month we will be conducting an expert survey of human rights experts in each of these countries. Survey respondents can be:

  • A human rights expert (researcher, lawyer, or other practitioner) monitoring civil and political rights events in one of the 13 countries. They may be working for an international or domestic NGO or civil society organisation;
  • A journalist covering human rights issues in one of these countries; or
  • A person employed by the National Human Rights Commission (only for Australia, Liberia, Mexico, Nepal, New Zealand or the UK).
If you have suggestions of specific people who could be survey respondents for one of these countries, or organisations we should contact to identify respondents, please get in touch.

If you have suggestions of specific people who could be survey respondents for one of these countries, or organisations we should contact to identify respondents, please get in touch using this form. We take security very seriously, and all information submitted is encrypted and will be stored securely. You can learn more about what we are doing to develop our new civil and political rights metrics inclusively and responsibly here.

Are you interested in learning more about the methodology we will be using to produce these new metrics? If so, please explore the rest of the HRMI website and check out this Open Global Rights blog post written by K. Chad Clay, our civil and political rights metrics lead.

The next few months will be an exciting time as we learn a lot more about the potential for this tool to produce valuable information. We look forward to making these new metrics public, on this website, in March 2018. You can join our mailing list here.

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